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Archives for the ‘Lincoln’ Category

A PROSPECTIVE VICE PRESIDENT HUMILIATED

ABRAHAM LINCOLN’S name was before the first National Republican Convention as a candidate for the nomination of Vice President of the United States. The convention assembled at Philadelphia in June 1856. At this time Lincoln was in attendance at a special term of the Champaign Circuit Court which began at Urbana on Tuesday, June 17, with Judge Davis on the bench. The judge and a few of the lawyers were putting up at a hotel where the landlady summoned them to breakfast by the ringing of a loud bell. The men thought they were being aroused too early, so they decided to get possession of the bell and conceal it during the term of court. By a majority vote, Lincoln was chosen to carry out the decree about removing the bell.
[pullquote]As soon as an opportunity presented itself, Lincoln slipped unobserved into the dining room and secreted the bell under his coat[/pullquote]
On the morning the decision was made, a little earlier than usual, just before noon, Lincoln was seen to leave the courtroom. This indicated to the other members of the bar that he was going to fulfill his assignment. He hastened to the hotel, and as soon as an opportunity presented itself, slipped unobserved into the dining room and secreted the bell under his coat. He was just in the act of making off with the bell when Judge Davis and Lawyer Whitney, two of the conspirators, came into the hotel, the former holding in his hand a copy of the Chicago Tribune which had just reached town. It contained the news that Abraham Lincoln had received no votes (not enough for election) as a nominee for Vice President at the Philadelphia convention.
“Great business this,” chuckled Davis, slyly calling attention to Lincoln’s bulging coat, “for a man who aspires to be Vice-President of the United States.” Lincoln only smiled as he still tried to keep the breakfast bell concealed and remarked with reference to the Philadelphia vote: “Surely it ain’t me; there’s a great man named Lincoln down in Massachusetts; I reckon it’s him.”


#13 in a series. See all episodes here.


From the book “Yarns & Stories by Abraham Lincoln, America’s Greatest Story Teller”, originally published in 1901. An exclusive epub edition by Puzzled Squirrel Press scheduled for this Fall. Illustration by Norman Dog.

Comments Disabled September 16th, 2011 Read more

ABE’S LOG

It was the custom in Sangamon for the “menfolks” to gather at noon and in the evening, when resting, in a convenient lane near the mill. They had rolled out a long peeled log, on which they lounged while they whittled and talked.
Lincoln had not been long in Sangamon before he joined this circle. At once he became a favorite by his jokes and good-humor. As soon as he appeared at the assembly ground the men would start him to story-telling.
[pullquote]How the “mensfolk” enjoyed polishing “Abe’s Log”![/pullquote]
So irresistibly droll were his “yarns” that whenever he’d end up in his unexpected way the boys on the log would whoop and roll off. The result of the rolling off was to polish the log like a mirror. The men, recognizing Lincoln’s part in this polishing, christened their seat “Abe’s log.”
Long after Lincoln had disappeared from Sangamon, “Abe’s log” remained, and until it had rotted away people pointed it out, and repeated the droll stories of the stranger.


#12 in a series. See all episodes here.


From the book “Yarns & Stories by Abraham Lincoln, America’s Greatest Story Teller”, originally published in 1901. An exclusive epub edition by Puzzled Squirrel Press scheduled for this Fall. Illustration by Norman Dog.

Comments Disabled September 10th, 2011 Read more

LINCOLN ASKED TO BE SHOT

Lincoln was, naturally enough, much surprised one day, when a man of rather forbidding countenance drew a revolver and thrust the weapon almost into his face. In such circumstances “Abe” at once concluded that any attempt at debate or argument was a waste of time and words.

[pullquote]”Shoot me,” Lincoln said to the stranger.[/pullquote]

“What seems to be the matter?” inquired Lincoln with all the calmness and self-possession he could muster.
“Well,” replied the stranger, who did not appear at all excited, “some years ago I swore an oath that if I ever came across an uglier man than myself I’d shoot him on the spot.”
A feeling of relief evidently took possession of Lincoln at this rejoinder, as the expression upon his countenance lost all suggestion of anxiety.
“Shoot me,” he said to the stranger; “for if I am an uglier man than you I don’t want to live.”


#11 in a series. See all episodes here.


From the book “Yarns & Stories by Abraham Lincoln, America’s Greatest Story Teller”, originally published in 1901. An exclusive epub edition by Puzzled Squirrel Press scheduled for this Fall. Illustration by Norman Dog.

Comments Disabled September 3rd, 2011 Read more

“ABE” GAVE HER A “SURE TIP”

If all the days Lincoln attended school were added together, they would not make a single year’s time, and he never studied grammar or geography or any of the higher branches. His first teacher in Indiana was Hazel Dorsey, who opened a school in a log schoolhouse a mile and a half from the Lincoln cabin. The building had holes for windows, which were covered over with greased paper to admit light. The roof was just high enough for a man to stand erect.

[pullquote]She noticed that Abe had his finger on his eye and a smile on his face.[/pullquote]

It did not take long to demonstrate that “Abe” was superior to any scholar in his class. His next teacher was Andrew Crawford, who taught in the winter of 1822-3, in the same little schoolhouse. “Abe” was an excellent speller, and it is said that he liked to show off his knowledge, especially if he could help out his less fortunate schoolmates. One day the teacher gave out the word “defied.” A large class was on the floor, but it seemed that no one would be able to spell it. The teacher declared he would keep the whole class in all day and night if “defied” was not spelled correctly.

When the word came around to Katy Roby, she was standing where she could see young “Abe.” She started, “d-e-f,” and while trying to decide whether to spell the word with an “i” or a “y,” she noticed that Abe had his finger on his eye and a smile on his face, and instantly took the hint. She spelled the word correctly and school was dismissed.


#10 in a series. See all episodes here.


From the book “Yarns & Stories by Abraham Lincoln, America’s Greatest Story Teller”, originally published in 1901. An exclusive epub edition by Puzzled Squirrel Press scheduled for this Fall. Illustration by Norman Dog.

Comments Disabled August 27th, 2011 Read more
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